hot-donuts

Low Carb Donuts Recipe

Yes, low carb donuts are a real thing.  And as you may know that while following a low carb W.O.E. it can be hard to find a great dessert that doesn’t involve cream cheese or other dairy products while being carb-thrifty.

These little gems are very thrifty at less than half a single net carb per mini donut. I used a Wilton’s non-stick mini donut pan.  It worked beautifully.  The recipe made 3 dozen mini donuts.

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too. Try cake-style or fried.This Low Carb Donuts recipe can be made ala baked cake donut alone. ~OR~

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too. Try cake-style or fried.They can be fry-finished in a small skillet.

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too. Try cake-style or fried.I’ll explain:

I found recipe sources online as springboard inspirations (see below).  As I experimented forged a recipe to my own tastes, I realized that I like both baked and fried donuts, but fried seemed not possible as the batter fell apart in the hot oil from lack of gluten, probably. :(.

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too. Try cake-style or fried.

How I finally succeeded:

I found a recipe at ‘All Day I Dream About Food’  for coconut donuts that suggested frying after baking. (Big, big thank you! It’s a great site!)  You just allow the donuts to bake till set and then put them in hot oil for 30 seconds or so in a small skillet to bring them up to golden brown and give them a lovely fried finish.  (See picture above.)

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too. Try cake-style or fried.After cooking up the first batch, I remembered an old donut-making trick from eons ago:  You place the warm donuts with 1-2 tablespoons of powdered sweetener (like Swerve) in a paper bag and closing it, gently tilt it back and forth to cover the donuts in sugar.  Then scoop up coated donuts out of the bag onto a straw and deliver to the serving dish:

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too. Try cake-style or fried.

The smell was so good that once again, I singed my tongue on my first taste.  It was heaven. – Enjoy!  Laura

Get it here. Make it at home:

Low Carb Donuts? Yes Please!

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too.
 Course Dessert
 Cuisine American
 Prep Time 10 minutes
 Cook Time 40 minutes
 Total Time 50 minutes
 Servings 36 mini donuts
 Calories 33 kcal
 Author Laura Hickman

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup Coconut Flour
  • 3 tbsp . Swerve swetener
  • 1/2 tsp Nutmeg (optional)
  • 1/8 th (pinch) tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/8 th tsp (pinch) Glucomannan / Konjac Powder (optional)
  • 2 tbsp Coconut Oil , melted and cooled
  • 4 large Egg , Whole
  • 1/4 cup Almond Milk
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • Coconut oil for frying
  • Powdered swerve for coating (optional)

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease mini donut pan.
  3. In a mixing bowl, stir together coconut flour,swerve sweetener, salt, baking soda, nutmeg (opt).
  4. In separate bowl stir together the eggs, almond milk, cocnut oil and vanilla.
  5. Sprinkle the konjac over the egg mixture and stir to dissolve.
  6. Add the Egg mixture to the coconut flour mixture and stir till batter is smooth and thick.
  7. Add 1 1/2-2 tsps. batter to donut well.
  8. Bake for 8 minutes, if frying. Bake for 10-12 mins for cake donuts. Allow to cool slightly and dump out of pan. If not frying, donuts are ready for powdered sweetener.
  9. Frying instructions:
  10. In small skillet heat about 1/4 inch, oil till hot, but not smoking. Carefully slide prepared donuts into hot oil and allow to cook just till underside is golden 10-30 seconds depending on oil temperature. Then carefully turn over each donut with a fork and repeat. Remove with a slotted spoon to paper towels to drain. Coat with powdered sugar, if desired.

Recipe Notes

While I can’t promise complete accuracy, if frying is skipped nutrients are reduced by 13 calories each.

Nutrition per donut:

  • Calorie: 33
  • Carbohydrates: 0.7
  • Protein: 1
  • Fiber: 0.4

Low Carb Donuts sounds like a fantasy recipe. With less than half of a single carb in all their scrumptious mini glory they taste fantastic too. Try cake-style or fried.Oh!  And if you are wondering why I chose ‘Donuts’ over ‘Doughnuts’ — Merriam Webster said I could!

 

Source:lowcarbjoy.com

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Low Carb No Bake Peanut Butter Cheesecake

It’s hard to believe that there are only a few peanut butter recipes on this blog. Peanut butter is one of my most favorite flavors, especially when mixed with chocolate.

I’m going to have to come up with a few more peanut butter recipes to add to my collection of low carb goodies. To start things off, I created this recipe for a low carb no bake peanut butter cheesecake.

This yummy treat is a perfect dessert to share at summer gatherings because it’s no bake. But, it’s also a recipe that can be made year round. Even family and friends who don’t do low carb will gobble down this tasty sugar free cheesecake.

With the heat of summer, no one wants to be turning on a hot oven to bake a traditional cheesecake. This no bake peanut butter cheesecake is made in a springform pan to give the look of a baked cheesecake. But, it sets in the refrigerator.

low carb chocolate cheesecake crust

I considered making this in a pie pan like I usually do for no bake cheesecakes, but I thought it would give a much better presentation using a springform pan, and it certainly does.

The gluten free crust is just a mix of almond flour, cocoa, sweetener, and butter. To make for easier cleanup, everything is mixed inside the pan and then just pressed in.

peanut butter cream cheese mix

When making the crust, I find it easiest to press the crust down with my hand. I do cover my fingers with a plastic baggie so the crust mix doesn’t stick to my hand.

You’ll want to make sure that both the cream cheese and peanut butter are at room temperature so that they are easier to blend with an electric mixer. If you don’t have time to wait, it usually only takes about 30 seconds to warm up in the microwave.

folding in whipped cream

Sweetened stabilized whipped cream is perfect for making no bake desserts. It’s just heavy cream whipped with gelatin added to prevent it from deflating.

Fresh whipped cream also gives the dessert a light and airy texture. To keep the whipped cream from flattening out, it needs to be gently folded into the peanut butter cream cheese mixture.

low carb peanut butter cheesecake springform pan

If you want to cut back on carbs, you can always omit the crust. Just spoon the filling into individual dessert cups. It’s more of a peanut butter cheesecake mouse if you do that.

Without the crust, I’d serve it with drizzled chocolate or sprinkle each serving with chocolate chips. Chocolate really enhances the flavor and color of peanut butter desserts.

low carb peanut butter cheesecake springform removed

I wasn’t planning on adding chocolate to the top of this cheesecake. But, when I removed the springform pan side, it was really plain looking. The cheesecake was begging for some color on top.

low carb no bake peanut butter cheesecake

I thought about just sprinkling on some chocolate chips to give a contrasting color, but I knew that might add too many carbs. So, I made a small amount of chocolate ganache to drizzle over the top which really made .

sugar free no bake peanut butter cheesecake

The chocolate ganache will harden in the refrigerator. You can omit the chocolate drizzle or coat the entire top of the cheesecake with chocolate if you wish. This rich and creamy cheesecake is sure to be enjoyed by all!

No Bake Peanut Butter Cheesecake

Enjoy this yummy low carb cheesecake any time of year. The gluten free crust is sweetened blend of almond flour, cocoa, and butter.
 Prep Time 15 minutes
 Total Time 15 minutes
 Servings 16 slices
 Calories 443 kcal
 Author Lisa | Low Carb Yum

Ingredients

Crust:

  • 1 1/2 cups almond flour
  • 1/3 cup cocoa
  • 1/4 cup Natvia or Swerve
  • 5 tablespoons butter melted

Stabilized whipped cream:

  • 1 teaspoon gelatin
  • 4 teaspoons cold water
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons Natvia powdered or 1/4 cup Swerve confectioners

Filling:

  • 24 oz cream cheese room temperature
  • 1/2 cup Natvia or Swerve
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 1/4 cups peanut butter

Chocolate Ganache:

    • 3 tablespoons butter
    • 1 oz unsweetened baking chocolate
    • 1 tablespoon Natvia powdered or 2 tablespoons Swerve confectioners
    • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

 Crust:
  1. Mix crust ingredients in 9-inch springform pan. Press down to form crust

Stabilized Whipped Cream:

  1. In a small pan, combine gelatin and cold water; let stand until thick.
  2. Place over low heat, stirring constantly, just until the gelatin dissolves.
  3. Remove from heat; cool (do not allow it to set).
  4. Whip the cream with the powdered sweetener, until slightly thick.
  5. While slowly beating, add the gelatin to whipping cream.
  6. Whip at high speed until stiff. Set aside.

Filling:

  1. Mix cream cheese, sweetener, vanilla, and peanut butter in a large bowl with electric mixer until well combined.
  2. Gently fold in stabilized whipped cream.
  3. Pour filling over crust and smooth top with rubber spatula.
  4. Refrigerate at least 4 hours or until firm.
  5. Run knife along edge of cheesecake in pan, then remove springform side.

Chocolate Ganache:

  1. Melt butter and chocolate in a small saucepan or microwave.
  2. Stir in powdered sweetener and vanilla.
  3. Drizzle chocolate sauce over top of cheesecake.

Recipe Notes

Makes 16 servings

Nutrition per serving: 6.0g net carbs

Nutrition Facts
No Bake Peanut Butter Cheesecake
Amount Per Serving (1 slice)
Calories 443Calories from Fat 360
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 40g62%
Sodium 268mg11%
Total Carbohydrates 9.2g3%
Dietary Fiber 3.2g13%
Protein 10.2g20%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Source:/lowcarbyum.com
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The Best Low Carb Keto Bread Recipe on the Internet

If you’ve been looking for what is definitively the best keto bread recipe on the internet, then you’ve come to the right place. How do I know it’s the best? Well, I’ve tried just about every keto bread recipe there is over the past few months and decided that nothing was good enough. There’s a couple that are good, but I wanted perfection! The best part about this recipe is that it’s simple, and once you have it down you can replicate this keto friendly bread any time you want. I’ve been making a low carb loaf every sunday for the past few weeks and would recommend that to anyone. It’s so nice to have a loaf of bread at your disposal when you’re on a low carb diet. It almost feels like cheating. Check out this recipe and start making the best keto bread you’ve ever tried today!

Healthy Low Carb Bread

The secret step in this recipe that takes this low carb almond bread from good to great is the separation of the eggs. You’re going to want to separate the yolks and the whites. The reason for this is that we’re going to whip the egg whites until they are fluffy. We’re looking for soft peaks. This will add some volume to the otherwise dense keto bread. Beating the egg whites is the answer to the denseness that comes with making an almond flour bread. I’ve made countless baked goods using almond flour and the main problem I’ve encountered is how dense the finished product is. The fluffy egg whites in unison with the high dosage of baking powder do a good job of getting this loaf nice and fluffy and adding some air pockets into the loaf. This makes for a better tasting bread.

What makes this the best keto bread recipe you’re likely to find is the fact that you can use it the same way you use actual bread. Sounds crazy right? If you search for keto bread on pinterest, or the internet you’ll find a different recipe for everything you might want to make. Want to make french toast? sandwiches? croutons? avocado toast? You can do it all with this keto bread recipe. You can even get crazy and throw this bread in a food processor and use it as italian bread crumbs. The possibilities are endless.

best keto bread avocado toast

Your Low Carb Bread Replacement Has Arrived!

The best part about this bread is that it makes it so much easier to eat a low carb diet. Yes, there are some savage beasts(joking) that don’t miss bread at all and are happy to just eat bacon 7 times a day, but if you’re anything like me, bread was a staple of your diet growing up and you still have a look of yearning in your eyes when they drop that bread basket in the middle of the table at family dinner. I feel your pain. This low carb bread recipe is your shoulder to cry on.

best keto bread sliced and toasted

Don’t Like Almond Flour?

If you dont like, or don’t have almond flour you can still make amazing keto bread! I would recommend that you don’t just try and substitute coconut flour into this recipe. Instead, give these keto dinner rolls a shot! They use a combination of coconut flour and psyllium husk powder to achieve a perfectly fluffy interior. Looking for something sweeter, we’ve got you covered there too with the subtle sweetness of our cream cheese bread!

As always, if you try any of our recipes or have questions, please leave us a comment or send us an email. Be sure to check back regularly as we put out 2-3 awesome keto recipes a week. Thanks!

The Best Keto Bread on the internet.  This recipe has been tested and perfected.

Nutrition

Calories: 90
Fat: 8g
Protein: 4g
Carbs: 2.25g
Fiber: 0.9g
Net Carbs: 1.35g

Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 Cup Almond Flour we get ours on amazon
  • 6 Large eggs Separated
  • 4 tbsp Butter melted
  • 3 tsp Baking powder We use this!
  • 1/4 tsp Cream of Tartar It’s ok if you don’t have this – We use this!
  • 1 pinch salt
 
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Separate the egg whites from the yolks. Add Cream of Tartar to the whites and beat until soft peaks are achieved.
  3. In a food processor combine the egg yolks, 1/3 of the beaten egg whites, melted butter, almond flour, baking powder and salt. Mix until combined. This will be a lumpy thick dough until the whites are added.
  4. Add the remaining 2/3 of the egg whites and gently process until fully incorporated. Be careful not to overmix as this is what gives the bread it’s volume!
  5. Pour mixture into a buttered 8×4 loaf pan. Bake for 30 minutes. Check with a toothpick to ensure the bread is cooked through. Enjoy! 1 loaf makes 20 slices.
Recipe Notes

Recipe Video is included in the body of the blog post!

Low-Carb-Family-Approved-Meals_pinterest

LOW CARB DINNER RECIPES TO LOSE WEIGHT FOR FAMILY

My husband and I have been eating low carb for over two years now. Slowly I have been trying to switch my kids towards it too. Cutting out the sugar from our diets is so much healthier, and I’ll admit, making multiple dinners every night is totally a pain! So far I have found a few low carb dinner recipes for the family that have received my kids’ stamp of approval. Not an easy task I assure you! Especially when mac n’ cheese and pizza is the competition!Before I get to the first recipe I have to recommend that everyone get themselves a spiralizer. This handy kitchen gadget makes noodles out of just about any round hard veggie so you can keep enjoying noodles without all the carbs. Now on to some of the low carb recipes my kids love.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

These Tex-Mex Zucchini Boats are easy and fun to eat. You can always chop up the zucchini instead of making them into boats.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

You have easy clean up with this One Pot Chicken Cacciatore. This would delicious over cauliflower mash or some zoodles zucchini noodles).

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

This is one of my personal favorites since I love anything with lemons and capers. This Skinny Chicken Piccata can be served over spinach or cauliflower rice.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

You don’t have to say goodbye to all your old favorites. You can still enjoy pizza guilt free. This Cauliflower Crust Pizza can be topped with all your pizza topping favorites.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

This Low Carb Chili Dog Bake is a game day favorite during football season.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

The key to this Pepper Jack Stuffed Turkey Zucchini Meatloaf is to make sure you squeeze the excess water from the zucchini.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

I haven’t made this Spaghetti Squash Carbonara yet but it is at the top of my list. My family is a huge fan of bacon!

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

I’m drooling over this Low Carb Lasagna Meatballs recipe. Look at all that gooey cheese!

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

Here’s a great way to get the kids to eat broccoli. This Chicken Divan Casserole is loaded with veggies, cheese, and chicken.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

Here’s another classic recipe turned into a low carb meal that the family will love. This Chicken Alfredo Spaghetti Squash is sure hit the spot.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

This Cheddar Chicken and Broccoli Casserole has a secret ingredient. I bet you’ll never guess they used for a bread crumb substitution.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

This Low Carb Pepperoni Pizza Chicken Bake looks ridiculously good! What kid can resist anything that has pizza in the name?!

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

This One Pot Cheesy Taco Skillet is ready to eat in only 20 minutes. A perfect low carb weeknight dinner recipe for busy families.

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight.Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

This is my husband’s favorite. The creamy sauce that these Beef Stroganoff Meatballs sit in is pure heaven! Serve it over some zucchini noodles or cauliflower rice. Yum!

Low Carb dinner ideas that are kid and family approved. Healthy doesn't have to taste bad. Low carb diets and lifestyles are becoming very popular. Exercise and eat low is a great way to lose weight. Low carb dinner recipes for family will make meal time much easier!

This Zucchini Lasagna is one of the first recipes I tried when I started cutting carbs from my diet. It tastes just like the pasta filled lasagna you’re use to. My only tip is to make sure the zucchini is dry before layering it or the whole dish will be watery. I usually saute my zucchini instead of grilling it.

Source:homemadeinterest.com

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7 Easy High-Protein, Low-Carb Dinners

There are endless ways to get crafty with low-carb dinners—veggie-crust pizzas, riced cauliflower, zucchini noodles, you name it. But while these substitutes can be great hacks if you eat low carb or are just looking for lower-carb options, creative often translates to complicated. And I don’t know about you, but most of time time, I just can’t be bothered.

I learned this about myself after I tried making cauliflower tater tots one evening in college. They turned out to be a delicious and healthy way to indulge a craving without throwing me off my healthy eating game, but there’s a reason I’ve only made them one time—the effort. And while sometimes I’m willing to put the work, most of the time, it’s not worth it to me.

The good news? Not all low-carb dinners have to keep you in the kitchen for hours (with a mile-high stack of dishes, to boot). These seven recipes each have less than 20 grams of carbs each, and not one of them requires you to hollow out a squash or throw a head of broccoli into a food processor. (And trust me, my bar to consider something “easy” is pretty high.)

Just to be clear, carbohydrates aren’t bad for you. Actually, your body needs them. But if you’re looking for low-carb options for whatever reason, whether you’re trying a new low-carb eating plan, or you just want to introduce more variety into your meals, these have you covered. And, as a bonus, each one has at least the R.D.-recommended 15 grams of protein to keep you going strong.

Jalapeno Shrimp Veggie Bake

1.Jalapeño Shrimp Veggie Bake from Cotter Crunch

This spicy dish proves that low carb doesn’t have to mean bland and boring. If you’re feeling especially bold, keep the seeds in the jalapeños for extra kick. Get the recipe here.

Per one serving: 253 calories, 9 grams carbs, 17 grams protein

Broccoli Avocado Tuna Bowl

2.Broccoli Avocado Tuna Bowl from Eating Bird Food

Avocado, roasted sunflower seeds, broccoli, and tuna work together to create a satisfying mix of textures. Get the recipe here.

Per one serving: 423 calories, 15 grams carbs, 38 grams protein

Taco-Stuffed Peppers

3.Taco-Stuffed Peppers from The Seasoned Mom

Bell peppers are a colorful and lower-carb shell for your favorite taco fixings. Get the recipe here.

Per one serving: 260 calories, 19 grams carbs, 26 grams protein

Thai Chicken Lettuce Wraps

4.Thai Chicken Lettuce Wraps from Inquiring Chef

This light weeknight dinner is way faster (and healthier) than ordering takeout. Get the recipe here.

Per one serving: 330 calories, 9 grams carbs, 38 grams protein

One-Pan Lemon Thyme Chicken

5.One-Pan Lemon Thyme Chicken with Asparagus from Cafe Delites

Working with just one pan automatically makes any dinner recipe easier. Get the recipe here.

Per one serving: 321 calories, 3 grams carbs, 35 grams protein

Shrimp and Zucchini Stir-Fry

6.Shrimp and Zucchini Stir-Fry with Miso Lime Saucefrom Cookin’ Canuck

This flavorful low-carb dinner proves that zucchini is just as good sliced as it is spiralized. Get the recipe here.

Per one serving: 208 calories, 10 grams carbs, 24 grams protein

Bacon and Cheese-Stuffed Rolled Chicken

8.Bacon and Cheese-Stuffed Rolled Chicken from Low Carb, So Simple

You can’t go wrong with a five-ingredient recipe of chicken, cheese, bacon, and a couple of spices. It may not exactly qualify as a “light” dinner, but it is delicious and easy. Serve alongside a simple salad to add some greens. Get the recipe here.

Per one serving:257 calories, 1 g carbs, 41 grams protein

Source:self.com

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Low-carb or low-fat – or neither?

The world of diet and weight loss can be confusing; is it better to go low-carb or low-fat?

In the tug-o-war between low carb or low fat, which one wins the war-o-weight?

It’s a question various experts are keen to understand. There are two basic arguments around weight-gain or loss. The first is that it doesn’t matter exactly what you eat because a ‘calorie is a calorie’ regardless of where it comes from. The second is that the macronutrient breakdown (fats, proteins, carbs) does matter because they have different effects on the hormones that determine when fatty acids are absorbed by fat cells and when they are released for energy.

Kevin Hall, a senior investigator at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, designed two studies in an attempt to test both hypotheses.

The food sources of calories matter very much indeed, and nearly everyone would be better off eating less sugar.

The food sources of calories matter very much indeed, and nearly everyone would be better off eating less sugar.

“The argument is that people are consuming too many carbohydrates, which drive up insulin levels in the blood,” Hall told the Centre for Science in the Public Interest last week.

“Insulin causes the body’s fat cells to suck in too many calories, and because calories are trapped in the fat cells, the rest of the body is starving. That makes you hungrier, so you eat more calories.”

Meanwhile, the body, thinking it is starving, “slows down its metabolic rate, so it burns fewer calories”.

Hall’s first study was titled: Do carbs drive you to gain more body fat because they boost levels of the hormone insulin? 

In it,19 participants lived in-house for one week so that the researchers could control what they ate. Their diet cut about 3300 kilojoules of fat or carbs.

“When we cut carbs, daily insulin secretion went down,” says Hall. This was contrary to what they expected.

If the carbohydrate-insulin theory was correct, the carb-cutting should have boosted fat loss “while relieving the internal starvation and therefore causing calorie burning to go up”.

Instead, they burned fewer kilojoules Hall explained.

In the second study, participants ate a high-sugar, high-carbohydrate diet for one month, before their carb intake was cut to just five per cent, while they “cranked the fat up to 80 per cent, and kept protein and calories constant”.

It again failed to show that cutting carbs sped up weight-loss more than cutting fat.

“The rate of fat loss actually slowed down for the first two weeks, and then picked back up to the normal rate again for the last two weeks,” Hall said, adding:

“If anything, there is a statistically significant greater fat loss and calorie burning on a low-fat diet. But the effects are so small that they’re physiologically meaningless. Sometimes you can’t see any significant difference, and sometimes you can see a few pounds difference that is clinically meaningless.”

In a new meta-analysis of 32 other “controlled feeding” studies, Hall found similar findings.

So ‘calorie is a calorie’ then? Not quite.

Harvard’s David Ludwig, a proponent of the low-carb, high-fat movement, argued there were design flaws in Hall’s research and noted the importance of the type of carb (or fat) we eat.

The carb-insulin problem, he said was the result of “all the fast-digesting, processed carbohydrates that flooded into our diet during the low-fat craze of the last 40 years — white bread, white rice, prepared breakfast cereals, potato products, crackers, cookies, and of course concentrated sugar and sugary beverages”.

In another new study, which is yet to be fully published, 699 overweight participants were prescribed either a low-fat diet or a low-carb diet for one year.

They were not told to cut calories, but to eat until they were full. They were however given one other instruction, regardless of which diet they were on: to eat as healthily as they could.

“We told everyone in both groups to eat as little white flour and sugar and as many higher-fibre vegetables as possible,” said lead author, Christopher Gardner, a professor of medicine at Stanford University.

Still, by eating healthily, both groups cut about 2000 kilojoules and, after a year had lost, on average six kilograms.

“We assumed that insulin-resistant people would do better on a low-carb diet – as they did in some earlier studies – but they didn’t,” Gardner said.

He thought that the “healthy” foods may be responsible for the results and was more significant than whether they were low-carb or low-fat.

“In some older studies, when researchers told people to eat less fat, they weren’t particular about which low-fat foods. Coke and white flour and sugar are low-fat,” Gardner said.

In a new article for the New Yorker, Jerome Groopman agrees its not clear-cut.

“The problem with most diet books, and with popular-science books about diet, is that their impact relies on giving us simple answers, shorn of attendant complexities: it’s all about fat, or carbs, or how many meals you eat (the Warrior diet), or combinations of food groups, or intervalic fasting (the 5:2 diet), or nutritional genomics (sticking to the foods your distant ancestors may have eaten, assuming you even know where your folks were during the Paleolithic era). They hold out the hope that, if you just fix one thing, your whole life will be better,” he writes.

And of course, none of it takes into account other factors that influence fat including genetic differences, and microbiome differences, excess intake of anything, sleep deprivation, stress and a sedentary lifestyle.

But, although it may not be clear-cut, it is relatively simple.

“With regard to weight loss, calories count and the relative proportions of fat, protein, and carbohydrate do not matter much (although low-carb diets may help with eating less),” wrote Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and Public Health at New York University, in response to Hall’s study.

“With regard to health, the food sources of calories matter very much indeed, and nearly everyone would be better off eating less sugar – at the very least because sugars provide calories, but no nutrients.”

Groopman adds that while the researchers battle it out, we should keep our sanity.

“What this means for most of us is that common sense should prevail. Eat and exercise in moderation; maintain a diet consisting of balanced amounts of protein, fat, and carbohydrates; make sure you get plenty of fruit and vegetables. And enjoy an occasional slice of chocolate cake.”

Source:stuff.co.nz

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12 Low-Carb Fruits and Vegetables

Getting enough fruits and vegetables each day can be a challenge for some, but research indicates that these foods can help to reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. Fresh fruits and vegetables are generally low in fat and calories, but they contain various levels of carbohydrates and sugars. And for some people trying to manage their intake, carb content is helpful to know.

Fruit

watermelon

Fruit tends to have a higher carbohydrate content than most vegetables, because of the naturally occurring sugars — they’re sweeter, after all. But that doesn’t mean you should avoid them. If you’re watching your carbohydrate intake, some fruit has a higher water content and therefore fewer carbs per standard serving.

1. Watermelon

This fruit of summer scores lowest in carbohydrate content, packing only 7.55 grams per 100 grams of fruit. It’s also high in vitamin A and has a high water content, making it a great high-volume food because it will fill you up while providing fewer calories. Even the rind has health benefits!

2. Strawberries

Berries are a popular choice for people watching their carb intake, and strawberries have the least. For each 100 grams of strawberries, you’ll get just 7.68 grams of carbohydrate. They’re also an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C.

3. Cantaloupe

This popular orange melon is great on a hot summer day, and contains only 8.16 grams of carbohydrate per 100 grams of fruit. Some people like to eat melons like this and honeydew with tuna salad. Try blending it with lime, mint, and water to make a refreshing agua fresca.

peaches

4. Avocados

Yes, avocados are a fruit, and they have relatively low carbohydrate content to boot. For each 100 grams of avocado, you’ll get an estimated 8.64 grams of carbohydrate. In addition, you’ll get healthy monounsaturated fats, known to be good for heart health, among other things.

10 reasons why avocados are good for you! »

5. Honeydew

Another melon, honeydew, comes in at 9.09 grams of carbohydrates for every 100 grams. It’s also an excellent source of vitamin C as well as potassium, an electrolyte you need to maintain good blood pressure, pH balance, and a healthy metabolism.

6. Peaches

A juicy and sweet treat, peaches surprisingly don’t have too many carbohydrates. For every 100 grams of fruit, you’ll get 9.54 grams of carbs. For a low-carb snack, serve them up with some cottage cheese, or try a peach blueberry smoothie.

Vegetables

celery

When you’re limiting carbs, vegetables are an important source of nutrition. They are high in fiber and lower in overall calories per serving than any other food group. They also contain an array of healthy compounds such as vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals. In general, the higher the water content, the lower the carb content per standard serving. These are the lowest-carb choices.

1. Cucumbers

Cucumbers are a refreshing and nutritious addition to any salad — Greek or otherwise! Peeled, they contain just 2.16 grams of carbs for every 100 grams. If you prefer them with peel, that’s 3.63 grams, which is still pretty low! Try them in this Mediterranean quinoa bowl.

Learn the top 5 benefits of cucumbers »

2. Iceberg Lettuce

Perhaps one of the most popular, though least nutritious, vegetables, iceberg lettuce has only 2.97 grams of carbohydrate per 100 grams. Pair it with several others on this list to get a low-carb salad with plenty of nutrients, or use iceberg lettuce to make some healthy spicy chicken wraps!

3. Celery

Celery is a versatile veggie that goes as well with salads as it does with casseroles. And with the same number of carbs as iceberg lettuce (2.97 grams per 100 grams), it’s worthy of inclusion in your diet.

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4. White Mushrooms

Mushrooms contain only 3.26 grams of carbs per 100 grams. Add them to an egg white omelet to get a healthy, low-carb breakfast. Or try something a little fancier, with this grilled oysters Rockefeller recipe.

5. Spinach

For every 100 grams of spinach, you’ll get 3.63 grams of carbohydrate. To put that in perspective, that’s only about 1 gram per cup. So, load up on spinach salads and top with lean chicken breasts and fresh strawberries.

6. Swiss Chard

Another nutrient-dense leafy vegetable, Swiss chard packs only 3.74 grams of carbs per 100 grams. Swiss chard is great in soups and sautéed with garlic.

source:healthline.com

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10 Things You Need To Know Before Trying The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet has been quietly developing a cult following online. Maybe you’ve heard about it, or maybe you haven’t. The main thing you need to know about “keto,” the popular nickname for the diet, is that it’s high-fat, moderate protein, and low-carb. Many people who have tried the diet say the results are unbelievable. It’s known to help with more than just weight loss, too, and has been credited to helping with diabetes, Lyme disease, epilepsy, and anxiety.

If you’re interested in trying the diet, here’s what you need to know first.

1. SAY GOODBYE TO CARBS.

‘Cause you can’t have ’em! Technically speaking, you will have carbs — about 20 grams (of net carbs) per day. The source of these carbs will be vegetables, probably. But the point of this diet is to get your body to stop running on carbs. So prepare to trade in pizza, bread, pasta, and even quinoa for salads, olive oil, avocado, and meat. BUT, before you say, “hell no, I won’t go,” know that you can have some of your favorites, like bacon, ranch dressing, and even butter.

Wait, is butter a carb? Kidding!

2. FAT IS YOUR FRIEND.

Fat is your new fuel. You’re going to need lots of it: roughly 90 grams per day, depending on your body and weight loss goal. Finding sources of good fat isn’t too difficult, though — just reach for some almonds, macadamia nuts, and avocado.

And forget everything you’ve heard about fatty foods and don’t even think about buying anything that’s low-fat; that’s the opposite of what you’re trying to achieve here.

3. IT’S GOING TO SUCK AT FIRST.

Think about it: Your body has to adjust to starchy carbs going MIA. You’ll probably experience something that people refer to as “keto flu.” Basically, when your body is going through the transition into ketosis, you’ll feel some flu-like symptoms—mostly headaches. But don’t worry, it won’t last too long.

4. BUT THERE’S BACON!

Bacon will get you through. Of course, having bacon every day isn’t a healthy choice, but having it at brunch will make you feel like you’re still a human while your friends scarf down waffles, home fries, and toast.

5. YOU ABSOLUTELY CANNOT HALF-ASS THIS.

If you think you can just eat keto-friendly foods and that will be all it takes, you’re in for a real surprise. The truth is, you have to weigh everything you eat so that you can calculate everything you eat and keep track of your macronutrients. You’re going to have daily goals of how much fat, protein, and carbs you should eat, and if you don’t reach them, you won’t see any results. In fact, if you start stuffing your face with all the bacon and cheese you can get, you might actually gain weight. So don’t cut corners.

6. YOU’RE GOING TO BECOME OBSESSED WITH READING LABELS.

As part of the diet, you’ll have to check for net carbs (total carbs minus dietary fiber) on food labels constantly. It’s not really a bad thing, but get ready to be the person who says “there’s way too many carbs in that!”

7. YOUR SOCIAL LIFE MIGHT TAKE A HIT.

Going out to eat isn’t the easiest thing in the world. There are absolutely keto options on almost every menu, but you’re always going to be wondering, “what kind of oil was this cooked in?” Or “were these chicken wings breaded?” And nights out drinking with your friends? Be careful. You won’t have the tolerance you had before (on the plus side, you’ll save money on drinks) and you might not want to drink at all. Why mess up progress with alcohol?

8. SOME PEOPLE MIGHT NOT UNDERSTAND.

It’s hard to explain keto to others. If you want to fully emerge yourself in the diet, you need to a lot about it. And trying to regurgitate all of that info to someone who isn’t on keto can be difficult. People will ask you why you want to deprive yourself of carbs, but you just have to keep your mind set on your goals.

9. YOUR STOMACH WILL THANK YOU.

I don’t just mean your abs — which will feel slim and less bloated. If you have stomach issues, like bloating, IBS, or just chronic food comas, you’ll feel so much better on keto. You won’t eat just to eat, you’ll eat to reach your daily intake goals. For a lot of people on keto, they say they don’t even feel hungry. Imagine that, being satisfied after your meal? #Goals.

10. YOU’VE GOT A FRIEND IN … THE INTERNET.

If you feel like none of your friends understand the diet, don’t worry about that. Not only can you google all of your burning keto questions, but you can find communities online of other people who are doing the diet. You can share recipes and success stories, struggles, and setbacks. You’re never alone.

Source:delish.com

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Is It Ever A Good Idea To Eat A High-Fat Diet ?

The dieting world keeps fluctuating between its lead villains. Now that we officially hate sugar, can every meal be loaded with butter, bacon and avocado instead?

When the low-fat-everything craze peaked in the late ’90s, Australians did not magically become leaner and healthier. Instead, twenty years on, we have an unprecedented level of obesity on our hands.

By now we have figured out that the other side of a ‘low fat’ food label should say ‘probably high sugar, will make you fat anyway’. As the case against sugar is mounting, that leaves dietary fats in an interesting situation. No longer the enemy, fatty foods are enjoying a comeback of sorts.

The trend is especially prominent within circles adopting the #keto lifestyle. On social media it stands for a parade of athletic bodies, hard-boiled eggs, odd-looking smoothies and a truckload of avocados served in every way imaginable. Keto is short for ‘ketogenic diet’, a scientific approach to going (very) low carb.

“The idea of a ketogenic diet is that you restrict carbohydrates to such a low level that your body is mostly using its fat, or the fat that you eat, as its energy store,” explains research scientist and nutrition expert Dr Tim Crowe. This process is called ketosis.

“When it’s doing that, it produces these things called ketones in your bloodstream. Everybody has ketones in their blood, but on a ketogenic diet the levels are much higher.”

The ketogenic diet is actually a medical treatment for children with hard-to-treat epilepsy; when the brain starts using ketones instead of glucose as an energy source, this can also reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures. But lately ketosis is starting to become popular outside its narrow medical application.

“Over the last five or ten years there’s been a lot of research done on that, that there is a potential place for [a low carb diet] in managing type 2 diabetes and, for some people, for weight loss,” explains Crowe.

For your body to enter ketosis, the carb intake has to be shockingly low, making it an extremely restrictive diet. A typical recommendation is to stick to 20-50 grams of daily carbs; two or three pieces of fruit or a single cup of rice could blow your entire carbohydrate budget for the day. Going into ketosis can also produce temporary symptoms such as brain fog, weakness and tiredness, which dieters sometimes call the “keto flu”. According to Crowe, all this makes it hard for people to stick to keto in the long term.

As a medical treatment, a ketogenic diet is used under strict medical supervision. If you’re doing it on your own, it can be difficult to make sure you’re balancing your micronutrients correctly, since foods high in protein and fat can easily have too much sodium, or not enough vitamins.

Bacon

Bacon is not a food group.

Furthermore, all fats are not made equal. Nutritionists advise that a healthy diet should include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats that largely come from things like olive oil, nuts, seeds, avocado and oily fish.

“These shouldn’t displace other healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, and wholegrain foods,” says dietitian Kacie Dickinson from Flinders University. But if you’re going #keto, it can’t all be butter and bacon like the Atkins diet of yore.

“Where there’s a problem is if you eat a high-fat diet that’s full of highly processed food as well,” says Crowe.

To see what happens to the body when you stuff it full of bad fats, researcher Matt Cocks from Liverpool John Moores University conducted a trial with 10 men and 10 women, putting them on a high-fat diet for seven days. The participants’ calorie intake was composed of 60 per cent fat – they gorged on things like sausages, bacon, cheese and hash browns.

Cock’s research features in the latest series of Dr Michael Mosley’s Trust Me I’m A Doctor (Monday 7.30pm on SBS, then on SBS On Demand).

“From time to time, most of us will eat far more than we should in the way of fatty and sugary foods. New research, however, suggests that overindulgence affects men and women differently,” Mosley explains. Mosley’s colleague on the show, Dr Zoe Williams, finds out more. “We all know that too much fat can cause issues with our weight and our heart health, but a new problem that’s only just coming  to light is that eating a lot of fat can also affect how our bodies process other foods, in particular carbohydrates,” she says.

Dr Zoe Williams in Trust Me I'm A Doctor

In Trust Me I’m A Doctor, Zoe Williams goes on a high-fat, carb-heavy diet to see how it affects her body.

The goal of Cock’s study was to see whether such a diet affects the ability to deal with blood sugar changes – if your body can’t deal with glucose spikes that becomes a risk for type 2 diabetes. Unsurprisingly, the unhealthy fats did contribute to the problem, especially for male participants. However, the trial was very small, so experts say it is hard to draw sound conclusions from it.

“It’s an interesting study to look at mechanisms, but they also ate 50 per cent more calories,” Crowe emphasises. “Anybody eating that amount of extra energy, even if it was coming from healthy fats, would start gaining weight.”

“Fat may have a role in suppressing appetite and energy intake through its effects on our digestive system,” adds Dickinson. “We need to understand this better because eating lots of fat in the diet can still lead to eating too many calories and eventually contribute to gaining extra weight.”

Ultimately, a high-fat, low-carb diet that puts your body in ketosis may work for weight loss in some people, but despite a few evangelical proponents it’s neither a magic bullet nor is it widely recommended, explains Crowe.

“It’s not miles in front of other approaches somebody could choose.”

 

Source

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How Does Low Carb Diet Work For Better Health And Weight Loss?

Going on a low carb diet is something almost everyone has either tried, considered, or heard about at some point. However, low carb diets may mean many different things to different people. The old style low carb dieting meant you ate butter and bacon all day. Most of us know that’s not the quickest ticket to good health, despite that the well-known approach might help you drop weight in the short term.

Thankfully, low carb diets have meant something much different these days. Low carb diets are now usually much more healthy for you and help you eliminate the most harmful carbs from your plate: refined (processed) grains, all added sugars and refined sugars, fast food, and junk food. Most also limit how much starch you have from foods like potatoes and sugars from fruit.

If you want to know more about weight loss, you can’t miss the following article that provides all useful tips you need:

Weight Loss Plan And Program: Create Your Own One

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Image Source: The Soulful Spoon

Well, there are many reasons why one might adopt a low carb diet. I have actually lived on a technically low carb diet for the last 10 years. At that time, it helped me overcome two serious medical conditions: chronic acne and food addiction. Here’s my experience with a low carb diet:

  • I don’t count grams per day like some diet advice suggests.
  • I don’t eat bacon and butter (or even meat), if you’re wondering.
  • I eat well-balanced meals rich in clean protein, ample amounts of greens, and any veggies I want.
  • I always include some healthy fats in my day.
  • I enjoy produce sources of carbs like berries, green apples, sweet potatoes on occasion, winter squash, pumpkin, and any kind of vegetable I want.
  • Fermented foods are also a daily part of my routine for optimal gut health and mood function.
  • I eat most of my fermented foods in the forms of kimchi, sauerkraut, plain (non-fat) Greek yogurt, coconut kefir, and 100% dark chocolate (which, yes, is a probiotic-rich food!).

What about whole grains and nuts? Generally, I even eat whole, gluten-free grains such as oats and wild rice if my body tells me it desires or needs them. This style of eating has helped me learn to crave healthier foods and realize just how much better my body feels on real food versus sugar and flour any day. I also find my blood sugar levels are better and my overall focus at work is tenfold what it used to be.

Besides what I eat, though, what could someone else gain from a low carb diet? Can’t these diets be dangerous? These are things you might be wondering, and with good reason.

Low-Carb-Diet

Here is why a (responsible) low carb diet can help you lose weight and improve your health:

  1. It can reduce the amount of sugar in your bloodstream, which is more beneficial for your blood sugar and heart health.
  2. Eating a heart-healthy diet rich in produce, lean sources of protein, and heart-healthy sources of fats (in moderation) can prevent the onset of Type 2 diabetes.
  3. It reduces insulin swings throughout the day due to better blood sugar levels — but don’t cut carbs too much or you may feel lightheaded and dizzy.
  4. It allows for individuals to see how carbs affect them more closely, which can help them tap into their hunger needs more than just giving into sugar and junk food cravings.
  5. It can help you drop weight either temporarily, through water weight when glycogen levels are depleted due to a reduction of carbs, or long-term, when the body starts to burn its own fat as fuel.

Here are some other things you should know about low carb diets:

  1. If you cut carbs back too much (from produce, especially), you may get sick and even feel like you have the flu. It’s better to take things slow and work on cutting out the added sugars, refined grains, and all processed and fast food before you go worrying about the carbs in berries and vegetables. Seriously, take it slow and focus on whole foods first.
  2. These diets can cause tendencies for disordered thoughts around food if taken too far. Once again, balance is key here.
  3. It is easy to consume too much fat, which even though is beneficial in small amounts throughout the day, is not always beneficial for everyone in large amounts and can lead to weight gain over time. This is especially true when talking about saturated sources in excess of what your body can process.
  4. You may have increased levels of thirst as your body begins to eliminate sodium and water via the kidneys. Drinking enough water as the body adjusts is essential.
  5. A low carb diet can be hard to stick to if you cut back too much on carbs. Once again, whole foods are carbs you should not be eliminating in the beginning unless you have a doctor’s orders.

How to set yourself up for a successful low carb diet:

salad

Image Source: Amy Selleck/Flickr

Focus on produce, lean protein, and small amounts of  healthy fats at each meal. Even if you’re vegetarian or vegan, this is simple enough to do. What about whole grains, you may be asking? Moderate-style low carb diets can include small amounts of whole grains throughout the day if your body tolerates them well. Some whole grains (especially steel-cut or rolled oats, wild rice, and quinoa) all have many health benefits that you can take advantage of if your body tolerates them. They are also excellent for lowering blood pressure levels and are rich in heart-healthy magnesium, potassium, and are good sources of iron. However, don’t overdo it on them and eat moderate portions (1/4 – 1/3 cup) once a day instead of relying on them at all your meals.

Lean protein and produce are your friends for weight loss and lean muscle mass, but you still need some healthy fats and whole food sources of carbs to thrive long-term. Just be careful not to eat lots of carbs and fat in one meal if you’re trying to lose weight. The body relies on either fat or carbs for fuel, but it can’t use both. If you’re trying to gain weight, however, here are some safe ways you can do that in a slow and steady manner.

Supplement tips and recipes to try on a low carb diet:

Image Source: Cotter Crunch

Finally, please don’t rely on diet bars, processed low-carb shakes, and pricey supplements. Get yourself a good multivitamin from a quality brand, a Vitamin D3 supplement, and a probiotic to support your gut health. Take these daily, and if you have issues with constipation or irregularity, eat more vegetables and add some chia or flax seeds to your routine (which you should be eating anyway since they’re great sources of fats and fiber!).

 

Source:lifehack